Quote of the day: 28 January

Although separated by an immense ocean, we are no less children of the same family. Our holy Mother Teresa of Jesus watches undoubtedly over you in a special manner, and deigns to cast an eye upon you from her place in Heaven, where her charity and her ardent zeal for the propagation of the faith in those countries which you inhabit are so efficacious before the throne of her Divine Master.

Discalced Carmelite Nuns of Riom, Auvergne
Letter to the Discalced Carmelite Nuns of Baltimore, Maryland, 1838

Praying for a nation

When considering the intersection of United States history and the Discalced Carmelite Order, there is one figure who stands out. Currier’s history of Carmel in America provides a fascinating insight into the life of one Mother Teresa of Jesus, a Discalced Carmelite nun from the Carmel of Baltimore (Juliana Sewell, 1799 – 1878).

She was a near relative of Francis Scott Key, author of the ” Star-Spangled Banner,” and she had strongly imbibed the patriotic spirit of her family. She always impressed it as a duty upon the young religious to pray for the political, social and religious welfare of the country. The celebration of the centennial anniversary of American Independence was a great joy to her heart, and she took much pleasure at the time in singing the Star-Spangled Banner and in relating little anecdotes of revolutionary days, which she had heard from her father, who, as we have seen, had been so intimately connected with General Washington. [1] [Clement Sewall was one of Gen. Washington’s staff officers]

 

 

Baltimore Carmelite on Biddle St

 

She took much pleasure at the time in singing the Star-Spangled Banner and in relating little anecdotes of revolutionary days…

 

The Saturday morning edition of The Baltimore Sun on March 29, 1873, devotes several column inches to a notice concerning the “removal of the Carmelite nuns” to a newly constructed monastery at the intersection of Biddle and Caroline Streets in Baltimore. Of notable mention is “the daughter of Clement Sewell, a distinguished citizen of Georgetown, who was on intimate terms with General George Washington.”

 BaltoCarmel_Aisq to Biddle (1)

BaltoCarmel_Aisq to Biddle (2)

BaltoCarmel_Aisq to Biddle (3)

BaltoCarmel_Aisq to Biddle (4)

BaltoCarmel_Aisq to Biddle (5)

[1] Currier, Charles. Carmel in America: a centennial history of the Discalced Carmelites in the United States (pp. 303-304)

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