Quote of the day: 16 March

This our American Carmel — your lifted hands are the very strength & hope of all our rising churches

J.M.J.

Eternity.

Now it grows very serious my mother, — the parting, & may be not to see you, o blessed, blessed, blessed souls of this our American Carmel.

Speciosa Deserti & lilia convallium — Every day may be the last on earth for me, for you my Mother & ye all her worthy Daughters — but just so has been the pleasing moment granted to me after 15 years of landing on this shore more endeared to me — it had always been so desired — & you have made it so extremely kind.

May that only joy of meeting as souls who wish to live but to their Jesus, his priests or his sacred spouses, ever be so pleasingly felt as it has been to my own heart these two days. I wish no greater encouragement to my friends when they will succeed me here for, whether simplicity or awkwardness I yield entirely to the pleasure of telling you how delighted I have been, how finding me among you nearer to the Sacred Heart to which you live so beautifully offered & united in this happy solitude.

Speciosa, Speciosissima Deserti — You live under his roof, return continually to praise him in his own presence in that choir, dead & lost to the world, though your very name the sweetest edification abroad while your lifted hands are the very strength & hope of all our rising churches.

0 Speciosa, Speciosissima lilia Deserti — I May I only be faithful to my own share of that common grace of your prayers, best of mothers, & ye all her worthy daughters. Accept my full gratitude & love in J. & M.

Servant of God Simon Bruté
Thank you note to the prioress of the Carmel of Port Tobacco, Maryland written at the close of his first visit, most likely in 1825 since Bruté arrived in the United States in 1810

Mother-Frances-Dickinson_Port-Tobacco
Mother Clare Joseph of the Sacred Heart (Frances Dickenson, 1755-1830)

Learn more about the Servant of God Simon Bruté and his cause for beatification

Father Bruté's letter was published in Charles Currier's Carmel in America: a centennial history of the Discalced Carmelites in the United States (1890)

Praying for a nation

When considering the intersection of United States history and the Discalced Carmelite Order, there is one figure who stands out. Currier’s history of Carmel in America provides a fascinating insight into the life of one Mother Teresa of Jesus, a Discalced Carmelite nun from the Carmel of Baltimore (Juliana Sewell, 1799 – 1878).

She was a near relative of Francis Scott Key, author of the ” Star-Spangled Banner,” and she had strongly imbibed the patriotic spirit of her family. She always impressed it as a duty upon the young religious to pray for the political, social and religious welfare of the country. The celebration of the centennial anniversary of American Independence was a great joy to her heart, and she took much pleasure at the time in singing the Star-Spangled Banner and in relating little anecdotes of revolutionary days, which she had heard from her father, who, as we have seen, had been so intimately connected with General Washington. [1] [Clement Sewall was one of Gen. Washington’s staff officers]

 

 

Baltimore Carmelite on Biddle St

 

She took much pleasure at the time in singing the Star-Spangled Banner and in relating little anecdotes of revolutionary days…

 

The Saturday morning edition of The Baltimore Sun on March 29, 1873, devotes several column inches to a notice concerning the “removal of the Carmelite nuns” to a newly constructed monastery at the intersection of Biddle and Caroline Streets in Baltimore. Of notable mention is “the daughter of Clement Sewell, a distinguished citizen of Georgetown, who was on intimate terms with General George Washington.”

 BaltoCarmel_Aisq to Biddle (1)

BaltoCarmel_Aisq to Biddle (2)

BaltoCarmel_Aisq to Biddle (3)

BaltoCarmel_Aisq to Biddle (4)

BaltoCarmel_Aisq to Biddle (5)

[1] Currier, Charles. Carmel in America: a centennial history of the Discalced Carmelites in the United States (pp. 303-304)

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