Quote of the day, 15 February: Fr. John Clarke, o.c.d.

For the occasion of the centenary of St. Thérèse’s birth, January 2, 1973, many people expressed the desire for a new edition of the Autobiographical Manuscripts.

Introduction to the Centenary Edition
Sainte Thérèse de l’Enfant Jésus—Manuscripts Autobiographiques

This book is a translation of the French publication made in 1972 to fill these specifications. (…)

I would like to assure Thérèse’s readers that I have tried to be absolutely faithful in translating into English what she beautifully expressed in French.

After her friends have waited so long to read her in the original manuscripts, it would be a shame, I think, to give them an interpretation of her words rather than an exact rendition.

Consequently, I have deliberately retained her own choice of words because this best expressed her feelings; I have retained her exclamation points even though we seldom use them; I have capitalized words that she capitalized because they had a special significance for her; I have retained throughout the text her habit of direct address to the one to whom she is writing; finally, Thérèse frequently emphasized her thought by either underlining words and sentences or writing them in larger script; this has been duplicated here through the use of italics of capital letters. All Scripture quotations are italicized.

Introduction to the first edition (excerpt)
Story of a Soul: The Autobiography of St. Therese of Lisieux
8 September 1974

I would like to express my gratitude to those who, in one way or another helped me to bring this book into being. First of all, I am extremely grateful to the Carmelite nuns of Morristown, New Jersey, for so kindly allowing me to reside on their premises over a period of many months, thus providing the atmosphere of peace and quiet so necessary for this type of work.

I want to express my thanks to Mother Marie-Thérèse, who read over my manuscript after translation and whose own knowledge of French was so helpful in detecting errors, omissions, etc. I thank also Sister Agnes for her expert work in typing the manuscript.

I greatly appreciate the hard work done by the Carmelite nuns of Cleveland, Ohio, in getting together an index for this publication. Finally, I owe much thanks to Father Kieran Kavanaugh, O.C.D., who was so helpful in so many ways by providing me with his expert advice.

Introduction to the first edition (excerpt)
St. Therese of Lisieux: Her last conversations
16 July 1976

The Institute of Carmelite Studies dedicates this volume of Saint Thérèse’s writings to our late collaborator and brother, John Clarke, o.c.d.

After completing his translation of all the letters and all the supplementary sections in this book, Father John Clarke died of cancer on February 15, 1985. In spite of our sense of loss, we take consolation from his enduring presence among us in his excellent translations of the works of Saint Thérèse.

Introduction to the first edition (excerpt)
General correspondence: volume II, 1890-1897

Father John Clarke died of cancer on 15 February 1985 and is buried in the Discalced Carmelite provincial cemetery in Holy Hill, Washington County, Wisconsin.

Clarke, J & Thérèse 1988, General correspondence: volume II, 1890-1897, translated by Clarke, J, ICS Publications, Washington DC.

Clarke, J & Thérèse, 2005 Story of a soul: the autobiography of Saint Thérèse of Lisieux, Study Edition, translated by Clarke, J, study edition by Foley, M, ICS Publications, Washington DC.

Clarke, J & Thérèse 1977, St. Thérèse of Lisieux: Her last conversations, translated by Clarke, J, ICS Publications, Washington DC.

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