Quote of the day: 14 March

They have declared to us to be determined and very resolute to undergo and suffer whatever bitterness, rather than withdrawing from their vocation

Meanwhile, the nuns, who in France are now in the greatest desolation, arouse in our hearts affections of the most tender piety, to the maximum that a great part among them from all these provinces have indicated their anxiety in letters, because they are prevented from persevering in their own institutes and observing solemn vows; together they have declared to us to be determined and very resolute to undergo and suffer whatever bitterness, rather than withdrawing from their vocationTherefore, O our Beloved Sons and Venerable Brothers, we cannot help but testify in the greatest possible manner to their constancy and their strength, and to pray with the most fervent petitions to want to encourage them with your exhortations and to offer them also, insofar as possible, every help.

Pope Pius VI
Quod aliquantum (excerpt)
Papal brief condemning the Civil Constitution of the Clergy
10 March 1791

12-13-07-MC-D-1634
On March 10, 1791, Rome, in Pius VI’s brief, Quod aliquantum, finally condemned the civil constitution of the clergy. The pope issued two further briefs on March 19, both aimed at sustaining the non-juring church in France. The first lauded priests who did not take the oath of the Civil Constitution of the Clergy, while the second conferred upon former bishops, or the vicars left administering their dioceses, the power to absolve cases normally reserved for Rome. Should contact with the Holy See be broken, they might now proceed with dates for ordinations without reference to Rome. [Source: Bush, Willilam. To Quell the Terror: The Mystery of the Vocation of the Sixteen Carmelites of Compiègne Guillotined July 17, 1774 (p. 86)] | Photo: Trial scene from the Canadian Opera Company’s production of Dialogues des Carmélites, 2013 | Michael Cooper, Canadian Opera Company / Flickr

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